Policy on accomodating disabilty of employees

This Guidance sets forth an employer's legal obligations regarding reasonable accommodation; however, employers may provide more than the law requires. This Guidance examines what "reasonable accommodation" means and who is entitled to receive it. Reassignment issues addressed include who is entitled to reassignment and the extent to which an employer must search for a vacant position.

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Only ten percent of small employers even know that there is a one in three likelihood of a worker between the ages of 35 and 65 suffering a serious disability, according to a 2002 study by the American Council of Life Insurers.

If the employer isn't prepared to accommodate a disabled employee in their business, they might not have the tools in place necessary to welcome and accommodate the disabled employee when such an illness occurs.

INTRODUCTION GENERAL PRINCIPLES REQUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AND JOB APPLICANTS REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION RELATED TO THE BENEFITS AND PRIVILEGES OF EMPLOYMENT TYPES OF REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS RELATED TO JOB PERFORMANCE JOB RESTRUCTURING LEAVE MODIFIED OR PART-TIME SCHEDULE MODIFIED WORKPLACE POLICIES REASSIGNMENT OTHER REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION ISSUES UNDUE HARDSHIP ISSUES BURDENS OF PROOF INSTRUCTIONS FOR INVESTIGATORS APPENDIX: RESOURCES FOR LOCATING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS INDEX This Enforcement Guidance clarifies the rights and responsibilities of employers and individuals with disabilities regarding reasonable accommodation and undue hardship.

Title I of the ADA requires an employer to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified individuals with disabilities who are employees or applicants for employment, except when such accommodation would cause an undue hardship.

The final section of this Guidance discusses undue hardship, including when requests for schedule modifications and leave may be denied.

to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified individuals with disabilities who are employees or applicants for employment, unless to do so would cause undue hardship. Pregnancy discrimination involves treating a woman (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) forbids discrimination based on pregnancy when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, such as leave and health insurance, and any other term or condition of employment.Additionally, impairments resulting from pregnancy (for example, gestational diabetes or preeclampsia, a condition characterized by pregnancy-induced hypertension and protein in the urine) may be disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).An employer may have to provide a reasonable accommodation (such as leave or modifications that enable an employee to perform her job) for a disability related to pregnancy, absent undue hardship (significant difficulty or expense). It is unlawful to harass a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth."In general, an accommodation is any change in the work environment or in the way things are customarily done that enables an individual with a disability to enjoy equal employment opportunities." "(i) modifications or adjustments to a job application process that enable a qualified applicant with a disability to be considered for the position such qualified applicant desires; or (ii) modifications or adjustments to the work environment, or to the manner or circumstances under which the position held or desired is customarily performed, that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of that position; or (iii) modifications or adjustments that enable a covered entity's employee with a disability to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of employment as are enjoyed by its other similarly situated employees without disabilities." The duty to provide reasonable accommodation is a fundamental statutory requirement because of the nature of discrimination faced by individuals with disabilities.