Free slut sex chat Cajun online dating book

When there might be a question of a slight change of spelling giving a totally different meaning (i.e. It's used the way Yiddish speakers use "tsooris" (meaning trouble, worries, grief.) Tsooris is perhaps more serious than mere agita, but in many sentences they can be used interchangeably. " This is a word my grandmother used to use, and for decades, we all thought it was Yiddish for skin mole.

Alta Kocker: literally, an old shit; or as we say in English, an old fart. Years later, long after she was gone, I was traveling in eastern Europe and learned this is the word for blueberry in many Slavic languages (as well as in Yiddish). And Wisteria Lane could not hold a candle to the intrigues that went on in those places, especially since the husbands often stayed in the city to work during the week and only joined their families upstate on the weekends. Bubbellah: (the "u" is pronounced like the "oo" in book) an affectionate way of refering to someone, much like "darling" or "sweetheart." Bubbies call their grandchildren "bubbellah." Close friends and long-time business partners might call each other "bubbellah," or boubbie, for short. the shorter "u" in Bubby, below.) Also, the nickname of a kosher-for-Passover pancake made with matzoh meal and eggs. "I just put out that bowl of nuts and you Chazzerai: (khaz-zer-rye) literally, pig slop.

cajun online dating book-35

Many assimilated Ashkenazi American Jews, whose grandparents or greatgrandparents only spoke Yiddish, or who spoke it as a first language, barely know any words at all. (a shame, a pity.) Many Yiddish words have entered the American-English lexicon.You will find maven (expert) and gonif (thief) in most dictionaries.(sometimes called, simply, AK) Years ago, my mother was trying to convince my then 8-year old nephew that he actually knew quite a bit more Yiddish than he realized. I don't know if my grandmother made up the alternate usage or if it was something she heard. bungalow colony) circuit, during the 1930's-1970's. Most of the Jewish (and some gentile) comics of the older generation got their starts or worked here, including Jerry Lewis, Joan Rivers, Robert Klein, Rodney Dangerfield, Shecky Greene, Woody Allen, Morey Amsterdam, Lenny Bruce, Don Rickles, Henny Youngman, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Milton Berle, Buddy Hackett, Shelley Berman, Alan King, Jonathan Winters and many, many more. ) The bunglalow colonies are too numerous to mention but my and my husband's personal faves are Pancrest Lodge (South Fallsburg) and Mountainview near Monticello. Let's just say the itinerant knish man wasn't just Broygis: (BROY-gas) angry, pissed off, with a mad-on, having a shit-fit, mad at someone, on the outs with someone, not on speaking terms. lah) a delicious bread made with lots of eggs, usually braided, and served at Sabbath dinner or other holidays meals (except Passover where no bread is allowed). "Chap a gang" means "catch a road" (or path or way) or, as we'd say in English, "Hit the road! Any kind of garbage, whether it's junk food, shoddy merchandise or stuff of little or no value. All my daughter-in-law feeds him is Chinik: (chi-nik; the "ch" in this case is pronouced as in the English "church") a tea kettle."For instance, you know what an America gonif: literally, "America the Thief" which has both positive and negative connotations. The hotels included The Concord, Grossingers, Kutchers, Browns, Granit, The Nevele -- mainly centered around the Monticello - Fallsburg, NY area (Sullivan -- aka "Solomon" -- County.) Sadly, almost all of them are now gone. "I just asked her if she was going wear that trampy outfit, and she got all Bubba Meisah: (bubba meye-seh) literally, a "grandmother's story," or old wives' tale, such as "You'd better stop making that face! " Basically, a story of dubious truth, often based on rumor, gossip or stemming from a desire to impress others or keep the kids in line. Has the consistency of an Italian panetone (without the add-ins) or French brioche. OK, my eyes are rolling back in my head just thinking about it!! (see "hock meir en chinik") "Chai" means tea throughout most of Asia (that's all kinds of tea; not just that spiced, sweet stuff you get at Starbucks!bread, anything with leavening, anything that can be made into flour.

Some people/sects also forbid rice and corn products as well. (and on...) (and on...) Technically, a Jewish home should be searched for and cleaned of all expedition to be successful however it is different than merely window shopping or "just having a look." It's more about exploring and accessing the physical attributes of the merchandise -- feeling the fabric; picking up a [which is pronounced the same way], meaning 'to pat/caress/squeeze/cuddle.'" My reply: That's a funny and interesting bit of etymology however I can pretty much guarantee my aunt never heard the Welsh word. I'm tell you, it's in Ess vi ein faygl, sheisse vi ein ferde! (Or, as my mother says, "He eats like he has three assholes.") (note: in this expression, "sheisse" --the German word for "shit" -- is used. Please do not ask for definitions of words already in this list! I do not answer questions about religion, customs, holidays, various sects, the Talmud, laws of Kashruth, etc. Gusoff: Thanks for sending me your book, Dirty Yiddish Slang. HOWEVER..please remember, this is a labor of love, done in my spare time. If you know the English word, and want the Yiddish, you can either use the "Find on This Page" function in your browser (usually under the EDIT menu) or go to THIS SITE or to translate from English to Yiddish (with results in Hebrew letters) go to Just because this is a Yiddish website, hardly makes me an expert on all things Jewish!The meaning of the same sentence changes completely, depending on where the speaker places the emphasis:) ? According to Rosten, there are other linguistic devices in English, derived from Yiddish syntax, which subtly "convey nuances of affection, compassion, displeasure, emphasis, disbelief, skepticism, ridicule, sarcasm, and scorn." Mordant syntax: "Smart, he isn't." Sarcasm through innocuous diction: "He only tried to shoot himself." Scorn through reversed word order: "Already you're discouraged?" Contempt through affirmation: "My partner, he wants to be." Fearful curses sanctioned by nominal cancellation: "May all your teeth fall out except one, so that you can have a toothache, God forbid." Derisive dismissal disguised an innocent interrogation: "I should pay him for such devoted service? Help keep Yiddish alive by learning new words and making them a part of your everyday conversation."r" is gently rolled, as the single "r" in Spanish or French.