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The family pays

The family pays $1,800 a month to live in its crowded flat across the street from an old landfill in this largely Latino enclave at the southern edge of San Francisco Bay, where the loudest noise can be the squawk of a seagull.Navarro works the night shift as a janitor at Stanford University, earning $15 an hour, while her husband drives a truck, for $20 an hour.

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The family pays $1,800 a month to live in its crowded flat across the street from an old landfill in this largely Latino enclave at the southern edge of San Francisco Bay, where the loudest noise can be the squawk of a seagull.

,800 a month to live in its crowded flat across the street from an old landfill in this largely Latino enclave at the southern edge of San Francisco Bay, where the loudest noise can be the squawk of a seagull.

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ALVISO — Ana Navarro lives with her husband and two young children in a 450-square-foot apartment.

The kids — ages 10 and 3 — share a bedroom that’s more like a glorified closet.

The South Bay Yacht Club is a social club without a marina — it closed years ago — but members still sit on the club’s deck, clutching mugs of coffee as they watch the sunset.

“You’re this close to the forefront of technology,” said Mike Hauser, 28, who rents in Alviso and works as a media producer in San Jose.

“If Topgolf comes in, it’s just going to increase the rent here,” said Mark Espinoza, who grew up in Alviso during the 1970s and now heads the Organizacion Comunidad de Alviso, which has sued the developers.

But proponents say the project offers a chance to preserve a semblance of the old Alviso: “It’s the best use of the land — the most open space, the least congestion,” said Dick Santos, a businessman and property owner whose father was mayor of Alviso in the 1950s.They got a deal on a brand-new house — four bedrooms and 2,700 square feet — for about 0,000. Plus, you could get a yard.” Jill was pregnant with their son, who went to grade school in Alviso, and she is now president of the Alviso Neighborhood Group.“It was just pre-peak,” Taylor remembered, saying the house is now worth around 0,000. Neither a newbie nor an old-timer in a town that’s filled with multigenerational families, she watches the changes around her with concern: “People who are getting ready to retire, they can up and sell to the higher bidder, who usually works in tech.” The community is “clinging to the old Alviso,” she said.But as in many other neighborhoods that are affordable compared with the region’s priciest cities, newer and renovated houses lately have sold in Alviso for closer to

But proponents say the project offers a chance to preserve a semblance of the old Alviso: “It’s the best use of the land — the most open space, the least congestion,” said Dick Santos, a businessman and property owner whose father was mayor of Alviso in the 1950s.They got a deal on a brand-new house — four bedrooms and 2,700 square feet — for about $500,000. Plus, you could get a yard.” Jill was pregnant with their son, who went to grade school in Alviso, and she is now president of the Alviso Neighborhood Group.“It was just pre-peak,” Taylor remembered, saying the house is now worth around $850,000. Neither a newbie nor an old-timer in a town that’s filled with multigenerational families, she watches the changes around her with concern: “People who are getting ready to retire, they can up and sell to the higher bidder, who usually works in tech.” The community is “clinging to the old Alviso,” she said.But as in many other neighborhoods that are affordable compared with the region’s priciest cities, newer and renovated houses lately have sold in Alviso for closer to $1 million, occasionally more.“I can see the path to change,” said real estate agent Steven Tran, who recently listed a duplex in the heart of Alviso — some local residents still call it “the barrio” — for $1.2 million. He touted the hamlet — home to only about 2,000 people — as a commuter’s dream, minutes away from Levi’s Stadium and “still affordable.” “It makes sense to buy a property,” Tran said.Factor in the cost of food, gas, car insurance and other necessities, and making the rent becomes a monthly drama.

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But proponents say the project offers a chance to preserve a semblance of the old Alviso: “It’s the best use of the land — the most open space, the least congestion,” said Dick Santos, a businessman and property owner whose father was mayor of Alviso in the 1950s.

They got a deal on a brand-new house — four bedrooms and 2,700 square feet — for about $500,000. Plus, you could get a yard.” Jill was pregnant with their son, who went to grade school in Alviso, and she is now president of the Alviso Neighborhood Group.

“It was just pre-peak,” Taylor remembered, saying the house is now worth around $850,000. Neither a newbie nor an old-timer in a town that’s filled with multigenerational families, she watches the changes around her with concern: “People who are getting ready to retire, they can up and sell to the higher bidder, who usually works in tech.” The community is “clinging to the old Alviso,” she said.

But as in many other neighborhoods that are affordable compared with the region’s priciest cities, newer and renovated houses lately have sold in Alviso for closer to $1 million, occasionally more.

“I can see the path to change,” said real estate agent Steven Tran, who recently listed a duplex in the heart of Alviso — some local residents still call it “the barrio” — for $1.2 million. He touted the hamlet — home to only about 2,000 people — as a commuter’s dream, minutes away from Levi’s Stadium and “still affordable.” “It makes sense to buy a property,” Tran said.

Factor in the cost of food, gas, car insurance and other necessities, and making the rent becomes a monthly drama.

million, occasionally more.“I can see the path to change,” said real estate agent Steven Tran, who recently listed a duplex in the heart of Alviso — some local residents still call it “the barrio” — for

But proponents say the project offers a chance to preserve a semblance of the old Alviso: “It’s the best use of the land — the most open space, the least congestion,” said Dick Santos, a businessman and property owner whose father was mayor of Alviso in the 1950s.They got a deal on a brand-new house — four bedrooms and 2,700 square feet — for about $500,000. Plus, you could get a yard.” Jill was pregnant with their son, who went to grade school in Alviso, and she is now president of the Alviso Neighborhood Group.“It was just pre-peak,” Taylor remembered, saying the house is now worth around $850,000. Neither a newbie nor an old-timer in a town that’s filled with multigenerational families, she watches the changes around her with concern: “People who are getting ready to retire, they can up and sell to the higher bidder, who usually works in tech.” The community is “clinging to the old Alviso,” she said.But as in many other neighborhoods that are affordable compared with the region’s priciest cities, newer and renovated houses lately have sold in Alviso for closer to $1 million, occasionally more.“I can see the path to change,” said real estate agent Steven Tran, who recently listed a duplex in the heart of Alviso — some local residents still call it “the barrio” — for $1.2 million. He touted the hamlet — home to only about 2,000 people — as a commuter’s dream, minutes away from Levi’s Stadium and “still affordable.” “It makes sense to buy a property,” Tran said.Factor in the cost of food, gas, car insurance and other necessities, and making the rent becomes a monthly drama.

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But proponents say the project offers a chance to preserve a semblance of the old Alviso: “It’s the best use of the land — the most open space, the least congestion,” said Dick Santos, a businessman and property owner whose father was mayor of Alviso in the 1950s.

They got a deal on a brand-new house — four bedrooms and 2,700 square feet — for about $500,000. Plus, you could get a yard.” Jill was pregnant with their son, who went to grade school in Alviso, and she is now president of the Alviso Neighborhood Group.

“It was just pre-peak,” Taylor remembered, saying the house is now worth around $850,000. Neither a newbie nor an old-timer in a town that’s filled with multigenerational families, she watches the changes around her with concern: “People who are getting ready to retire, they can up and sell to the higher bidder, who usually works in tech.” The community is “clinging to the old Alviso,” she said.

But as in many other neighborhoods that are affordable compared with the region’s priciest cities, newer and renovated houses lately have sold in Alviso for closer to $1 million, occasionally more.

“I can see the path to change,” said real estate agent Steven Tran, who recently listed a duplex in the heart of Alviso — some local residents still call it “the barrio” — for $1.2 million. He touted the hamlet — home to only about 2,000 people — as a commuter’s dream, minutes away from Levi’s Stadium and “still affordable.” “It makes sense to buy a property,” Tran said.

Factor in the cost of food, gas, car insurance and other necessities, and making the rent becomes a monthly drama.

.2 million. He touted the hamlet — home to only about 2,000 people — as a commuter’s dream, minutes away from Levi’s Stadium and “still affordable.” “It makes sense to buy a property,” Tran said.Factor in the cost of food, gas, car insurance and other necessities, and making the rent becomes a monthly drama.